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Whole Hog Readers

A few words from John Strak, the Editor of Whole Hog....

We have been publishing Whole Hog Brief every month since 1999 and there are several ways to access our charts/tables.

We put our Latest Headlines on the site from the most recent issue of Whole Hog Brief so you will know what we are covering this month - we suggest you register on the site and we will email you when these headlines are changed each month as new issues are published. You can also follow our Editor's Tweets by following @johnstrak

The Editor's Blog is refreshed 2 or 3 times a month depending on the news and we Tweet from @johnstrak when a new Blog is published - and we email those registered on our site. 

You can buy the latest issue of Whole Hog by visiting the Current Issue page in the shop.

You can buy back issues by visiting the different years detailed in the drop down link and archives in the shop through the link on our Main Menu.

Or you can become a Subscriber to Whole Hog by visiting the Subscription page in the shop where your payment will entitle you to twelve issues over the next year including the latest issue. If you change your mind and don't want to continue with a subscription we will give you a refund if you tell us the reason why you are not satisfied within 28 days.

If you want multiple copies of Whole Hog for colleagues in your organisation please email  subscriptions@porkinfo.com for details of multi-user rates

Read more about these options by visiting our Reading Whole Hog page

Dr John Strak, Editor Whole Hog

 

Some headlines from the past

We have been  publishing Whole Hog Brief since 1999 so we have seen a few headlines come and go....

Headline stories about;

- foot and mouth,

- swine fever,

- BSE,

- Nipah virus,

- swine flu, and dioxin poisoning

and many forecasts of doom and gloom for prices - and profits going through the roof, or the floor - have all been reported in Whole Hog, and put into perspective.

 

The various outbreaks of disease have all had an impact on pig prices and the international trade in pigmeat. And so has globalization and changes in the world economy.

And because the global pig industry is susceptible to pig price cycles these events have often created a boom and bust pattern of behaviour.

Even without price cycles it is often difficult to see trends and separate them out from seasonality and random events. Most of all, it may be difficult to see how demand and supply in one part of the world affects trade and production in another. With the rise of Chinese and Asian demand in recent years this has become even trickier.

We are proud to claim that - since 1999 - we have consistently reported accurate facts and figures for the global pig industry and correctly predicted each turning point in the trend of global pig prices. No-one has a better record at forecasting the trends in pig prices

 

We cannot predict where or when the next disease outbreak will occur but we can predict that you will be better prepared for dealing with it if you know the pattern of production and trade before the outbreak - that's one reason why Whole Hog is worth reading. Understanding price behaviour and price trends is another.

We gave our market newsletter the title of Whole Hog because we aim to give you ALL the information that you need - The Whole Hog - to make sound business decisions.

Whether you are a farmer contemplating expansion of the herd, or a processor thinking about new investments in abattoirs or cutting plants, an analyst trying to assess meat company business plans, or a purchasing manager wondering what prices to agree for pork supplies in the coming year, Whole Hog is a worthwhile addition to your regular reading. Our subscribers often write in and thank us for alerting them to facts and figures that affect their commercial decisions and that save them money - and make them extra profits.